Home > Uncategorized > Forecasting Mortality Reduction from ANRI use in Heart Failure

Forecasting Mortality Reduction from ANRI use in Heart Failure

Fonarow et al report on the potential mortality reduction with the introduction of ANRI access to patients with heart failure in the United States. The authors make comparisons with other cardiovascular therapy.

Abstract

IMPORTANCE

Angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibition (ARNI) therapy provided incremental survival benefit to patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) in clinical trials. To date, estimation of the potential benefits that could be gained from optimal implementation of ARNI therapy at the population level have not been quantified.OBJECTIVE To quantify the projected gains for deaths prevented or postponed with comprehensive implementation of ARNI therapy for patients with HFrEF in the United States.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

Eligibility criteria for ARNI therapy, population-based estimates of patients with HFrEF in the United States, and numbers needed to treat to overt death were obtained from published sources. The potential numbers of deaths prevented or
postponed as a result of ARNI were estimated along with multiple-way sensitivity analysis.

MAIN OUTCOME AND MEASURE

All-cause mortality.

RESULTS

Of 2 736 000 patients with HFrEF patients in the United States, 2 287 296 (84%) were projected to be candidates for ARNI therapy. Optimal implementation of ARNI therapy was empirically estimated to prevent 28 484 deaths a year (range, 18 230-41 017 deaths per year).

CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE

A substantial number of deaths in the United States could potentially be prevented by optimal implementation of ARNI therapy. These data support implementation of evidence into practice in a timely manner because this may have a
material impact on population health among patients with HFrEF.

anri

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