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Archive for the ‘dilated cardiomyopathy’ Category

Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Halliday et al (Circulation. 2017;135:2106–2115. DOI: 10.1161/CIRCULATIONAHA.116.026910) report on the relationship between late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac MRI and sudden cardiac death in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. They identify a subgroup with LVEF \ge 40% at increased risk of sudden cardiac death.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Current guidelines only recommend the use of an implantable
cardioverter defibrillator in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy for the primary prevention of sudden cardiac death (SCD) in those with a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) 35%. Patients with an LVEF >35% also have low competing risks of death from nonsudden causes. Therefore, those at high risk of SCD may gain longevity from successful implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy. We investigated whether late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance identified patients with dilated cardiomyopathy without severe LV systolic dysfunction at high risk of SCD.

METHODS

We prospectively investigated the association between midwall LGE and the prespecified primary composite outcome of SCD or aborted SCD among consecutive referrals with dilated cardiomyopathy and an LVEF ≥40% to our center between January 2000 and December 2011 who did not have a preexisting indication for implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation.

RESULTS

Of 399 patients (145 women, median age 50 years, median LVEF 50%, 25.3% with LGE) followed for a median of 4.6 years, 18 of 101 (17.8%) patients with LGE reached the prespecified end point, compared with 7 of 298 (2.3%) without (hazard ratio [HR], 9.2; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.9–21.8; P<0.0001). Nine patients (8.9%) with LGE compared with 6 (2.0%) without (HR,4.9; 95% CI, 1.8–13.5; P=0.002) died suddenly, whereas 10 patients (9.9%) with LGE compared with 1 patient (0.3%) without (HR, 34.8; 95% CI, 4.6–266.6; P<0.001) had aborted SCD. After adjustment, LGE predicted the composite end point (HR, 9.3; 95% CI, 3.9–22.3; P<0.0001), SCD (HR, 4.8; 95% CI, 1.7–13.8; P=0.003), and aborted SCD (HR, 35.9; 95% CI, 4.8–271.4; P5% compared with those without LGE were 10.6 (95% CI, 3.9–29.4), 4.9 (95% CI, 1.3–18.9), and 11.8 (95% CI, 4.3–32.3), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Midwall LGE identifies a group of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and an LVEF ≥40% at increased risk of SCD and low risk of nonsudden death who may benefit from implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation.

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Late Gadolinium Enhancement in Dilated Cardiomyopathy and SCD risk

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Di Marco et al report a systematic review and meta-analysis of the relationship between late gadolinium enhancement on cardiac MRI in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy and ventricular arrhythmias. The authors suggest that the evidence for independent prognostic value has implications for primary prevention ICD’s.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) on cardiac magnetic resonance imaging and ventricular arrhythmias or sudden cardiac death (SCD) in patients with dilated
cardiomyopathy (DCM).

BACKGROUND

Risk stratification for SCD in DCM needs to be improved.

METHODS

A systematic review and meta-analysis were conducted. A systematic search of PubMed and Ovid was performed, and observational studies that analyzed the arrhythmic endpoint (sustained ventricular arrhythmia, appropriate implantable cardioverter-defibrillator [ICD] therapy, or SCD) in patients with DCM, stratified by the presence or absence of LGE, were included.

RESULTS

Twenty-nine studies were included, accounting for 2,948 patients. The studies covered a wide spectrum of DCM, with a mean left ventricular ejection fraction between 20% and 43%. LGE was significantly associated with the arrhythmic endpoint both in the overall population (odds ratio: 4.3; p < 0.001) and when including only those studies that performed multivariate analysis (hazard ratio: 6.7; p < 0.001). The association between LGE and the arrhythmic endpoint remained significant among studies with mean left ventricular ejection fractions >35% (odds ratio: 5.2; p < 0.001) and was maximal in studies that included only patients with primary prevention ICDs (odds ratio: 7.8;
p ¼ 0.008).

CONCLUSIONS

Across a wide spectrum of patients with DCM, LGE is strongly and independently associated with ventricular arrhythmia or SCD. LGE could be a powerful tool to improve risk stratification for SCD in patients with DCM. These results raise 2 major questions to be addressed in future studies: whether patients with LGE could benefit from primary prevention ICDs irrespective of their left ventricular ejection fractions, while patients without LGE might not need
preventive ICDs despite having severe left ventricular dysfunction.